Consumer Products AM 2024

Published on: June 2024

This new market study from VoxelMatters provides an in-depth analysis and forecast of polymer and metal AM in the consumer products industry across the three core segments of the additive manufacturing market: hardware, materials and services.

The report includes the full dataset for hardware, materials and services.

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*Subject to minor changes in the final report

 

About the report 

This new report represents the first major study by VoxelMatters on the adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) in the consumer products industry. The report features 150 charts and data tables, providing an in-depth analysis of the use of (metal and polymer) AM hardware, AM materials, and AM services across multiple consumer product segments. An additional analysis provides key insights on the value generated via internal additive manufacturing activity by end-user companies.

Leveraging VoxelMatters’ unique data, the report provides an accurate analysis of the current state of AM in consumer products manufacturing, highlighting specific and strategic technologies, materials, and processes. This is complemented by 10-year forecasts on the business potential of AM in major consumer product segments.

One of the unique characteristics of additive manufacturing is that the term refers to many manufacturing technologies and encompasses an extremely broad range of industrial sectors. To understand the full impact of additive manufacturing on global production, one must gain a deep understanding of core AM technologies, materials, and services across different material segments (metals, polymers, composites, and ceramics) and their economic potential. It is also important to comprehend the impact that these technologies, materials, and services have on key vertical industrial segments.

The consumer products manufacturing industry is a major adopter of additive manufacturing for prototyping and tooling, and also a major first adopter of AM for end-use part production. However, to fully understand the impact of AM on consumer products, it is also necessary to understand each major consumer product subsegment. This report looks at specific trends and the business potential of AM adoption across several key consumer product subsegments: Footwear (including insoles, midsoles, and entire shoes), Eyewear (frames), Sports equipment (gear and accessories), Jewelry, Design products (furniture, lighting), Consumer electronics, Fashion, and Toys.

This report leverages the extensive data collected and published in VoxelMatters’ Core AM reports on Polymer AM and Metal AM, including information from niche areas such as Ceramic AM (also a major VoxelMatters study). The data included in this report takes into consideration collected data on consumer products shipments and revenues for Hardware, Materials, and Services, for both polymers and metals. This data is then compared and combined with new data obtained from a survey and audit of 143 companies active in the consumer products sector that are known users of additive manufacturing.

In total, this report is based on data from 1,346 core AM operators for polymers and metals (of which 1,098 are unique companies, as some operate in both metals and polymers), resulting in a grand total of nearly 1,241 unique companies if we include the end-users. All of these companies are listed in the VoxelMatters Directory, the largest global directory of verified AM companies with nearly 7,000 listings across all AM-related segments.

Prominent and up-and-coming core AM companies surveyed and featured in the report include 3D Systems, Airtech, Anycubic, ARRIS, BASF Forward AM, Bambu Lab, Caracol, Carbon, Cooksongold, Creality, Digital Metal (Markforged), EOS, Evonik, ExOne and ETEC (Desktop Metal), Formlabs, Genera, Greenfill3D, HP 3D Printing, Legor, Luxcreo, Materialise, Massivit, MX3D, OECHSLER, Progol3D, Prusa Research, Raise3D, Shapeways, Stratasys, Ultimaker, voxeljet, and many others.

End user companies surveyed and/or audited/analyzed for this report include adidas, Aectual, Apple, Barrelhand, Beretta, Brooks Running, COBRA, Dior, Elli Design, Götti, Grohe, Hoet, Honor, Hoya, King Children, Kohler, LEGO, Luxottica, Meta, Microsoft, Mikita, MONOQOOL, New Balance, Nike, nVidia, PEAK, Pinarello, Posedla, Puma, Riddel, Safilo, Scope, Sennheiser, Signify (Philips), Specialized, Superfeet, The New Raw, Wilson, YOU MAWO, Zellerfeld, and many others.

In addition to supporting the market analysis and development efforts of current suppliers, the report is targeted towards companies looking to enter the market and capitalize on developing opportunities. Consumer products OEMs looking to implement AM for polymer part production will benefit from this study by quickly and accurately understanding currently available technologies, materials, and services, as well as the benefits, challenges, and market potential of each. Finally, this document serves as a guide for investors looking for the next disruptive production technologies.

To learn more about the scope of this study and the methodology behind this research please contact us.

*Subject to minor changes in the final report

1. Introduction to 3D printing of consumer products

1.1. Types of consumer products that benefit from 3D printing
1.1.1. Footwear
1.1.2. Eyewear
1.1.3. Sportswear and sport accessories
1.1.4. Electronics and consumer electronics (incl. replacement parts)
1.1.5. Jewelry and luxury accessories
1.1.6. Toys
1.1.7. Fashion, furniture and other design products
1.2. Drivers for additive manufacturing adoption in consumer product segments
1.2.1. Internal vs external use of 3D printing
1.3. Types of 3D printed parts used in consumer product industries
1.3.1. Prototypes and models
1.3.2. Tools
1.3.3. Final parts
1.4. Assessing the size of consumer products industries (TAM)
1.5. Analysis of current am revenues in consumer product industries
1.6. Ten-year forecast of additive manufacturing opportunities in consumer product industries
1.7. Methodology

2. AM hardware adoption in consumer products industry segments
2.1. A short history of additive manufacturing for consumer products
2.2. Key AM hardware technologies used for consumer products manufacturing
2.2.1. Polymer and Composite AM hardware opportunities in Consumer products
2.2.1.1. Polymer and Composite Material Extrusion (MEX)
2.2.1.2. Polymer Vat Photopolymerization – Polymer VPP
2.2.1.3. Polymer Powder Bed Fusion – Polymer PBF
2.2.1.4. Material Jetting – MJP
2.2.2. Metal AM hardware opportunities in consumer products
2.2.2.1. Metal Powder Bed Fusion – Metal PBF
2.2.2.2. Metal Binder Jetting – MBJ
2.2.2.3. Bound Metal Printing – BMP
2.2.2.4. Directed Energy Deposition (DED)
2.2.3. Ceramic and sand AM hardware opportunities in consumer products
2.2.3.1. Ceramic Vat Photopolymerization – Ceramic VPP
2.2.3.2. Ceramic Binder Jetting – CBJ
2.2.3.3. Ceramic Material Extrusion – Ceramic MEX
2.2.3.3.1. Bound Ceramic Printing
2.2.3.3.2. Pneumatic Material Extrusion
2.2.4. Leading ceramic hardware technologies companies’ strategies for consumer products
2.3. Analysis of AM hardware market for consumer products
2.3.1. AM hardware in Consumer
2.3.2. AM hardware in Design
2.3.3. AM hardware in Jewelry
2.3.4. AM hardware by sub-vertical
2.4. Ten-year forecast of AM hardware for consumer products
2.4.1. Ten-year forecast for AM hardware in Consumer
2.4.2. Ten-year forecast for AM hardware in Design
2.4.3. Ten-year forecast for AM hardware in Jewelry
2.4.4. Ten-year forecast for AM hardware by sub-vertical

3. Evolving material demand in consumer additive manufacturing
3.1. Polymers and composites
3.1.1. TPU
3.1.1.1. Filaments and pellets
3.1.1.2. Powders
3.1.2. Nylon
3.1.2.1. Nylon Powders
3.1.2.1.1. Nylon 12 for polymer L-PBF
3.1.2.1.2. Nylon 12 for polymer Thermal PBF (MJF, HSS)
3.1.2.1.3. Nylon 11 for polymer L-PBF
3.1.2.1.4. Nylon 11 for polymer thermal PBF
3.1.2.5. Filaments
3.1.2.6. Pellets
3.1.3. PET/PETG
3.1.3.1. PET/PETG filaments for extrusion 3D printing
3.1.3.2. PET/PETG pellets for extrusion 3D printing
3.1.4. Polypropylene (PP)
3.1.4.1. Polypropene filaments for extrusion 3D printing
3.1.4.2. Polypropylene pellets for extrusion 3D printing
3.1.4.3. Powders
3.1.5. PLA
3.1.5.1. PLA filaments for extrusion 3D printing
3.1.5.2. PLA pellets for extrusion 3D printing
3.1.5.3. Powders
3.2. Photopolymers
3.2.1. Photopolymers for stereolithography (SLA, DLP, LCD)
3.2.1.1. Modeling resins for consumer products prototyping
3.2.1.2. Castable resins for consumer products manufacturing
3.2.1.3. Tough and rigid digital materials (ABS-like, PP-like, PC-like, TPU-like, PEEK-like) for consumer products functional prototyping and low-batch manufacturing
3.2.1.4. High-temperature and molding resins for consumer products manufacturing
3.2.1.5. Flexible (TPU-like, rubber-like) resins
3.2.2. High-speed vat photopolymerization materials for part production
3.2.2.1. Urethane-based and cast urethane alternatives
3.2.2.2. Silicone-based and molded silicone alternatives
3.2.3. Photopolymers for material jetting
3.3. Thermosets
3.3.1. Silicone for 3D printing
3.3.2. Thermoset Polyurethane for 3D printing
3.4. Metals and alloys
3.4.1. Stainless steel materials for consumer products AM
3.4.2. Titanium and titanium alloy materials for consumer products AM
3.4.3. Precious metal powders for consumer products AM
3.4.4. Aluminum alloy powders for AM of consumer products
3.5. Ceramics
3.5.1. Technical ceramics (zirconia and alumina)
3.5.2. Traditional ceramics (sand, clay, concrete)
3.6. Analysis of AM material market for consumer products
3.6.1. AM material in Consumer
3.6.2. AM material in Design
3.6.3. AM material in Jewelry
3.6.4. AM material by sub-vertical
3.7. Ten-year forecast of AM material for consumer products
3.7.1. Ten-year forecast for AM material in Consumer
3.7.2. Ten-year forecast for AM material in Design
3.7.3. Ten-year forecast for AM material in Jewelry
3.7.4. Ten-year forecast for AM material by sub-vertical

4. Leveraging AM services for consumer products
4.1. Types of AM services catering to consumer product manufacturers
4.1.1. Pure AM Player
4.1.2. Design and rapid prototyping service providers for consumer products
4.1.2.1. SMEs AM service providers
4.1.3. Large polymer AM services and AM factories
4.1.4. Contract manufacturers providing AM parts and AM services
4.1.5. AM material manufacturers offering AM services
4.1.6. AM hardware providers offering AM production services
4.1.7. AM/3D printing service networks
4.2. AM Services catering to specific consumer product segments
4.2.1. AM services in Footwear
4.2.2. AM services in Eyewear
4.2.3. AM services in Sportswear and Sporting Products
4.2.4. AM services in Consumer Electronics
4.2.5. AM services in Jewelry
4.2.6. AM services in Fashion
4.2.7. AM services in Toys
4.2.8. AM services in Furniture and Design Products
4.3. Software and 3D data capturing strategies for 3D printing of consumer products
4.3.1. Shoe design
4.3.2. Eyewear design
4.3.3. Jewelry design
4.4. Analysis of AM services market for consumer products
4.4.1. AM services in Consumer
4.4.2. AM services in Design
4.4.3. AM services in Jewelry
4.4.4. AM services by sub-vertical
4.5. Ten-year forecast of AM services for consumer products
4.5.1. Ten-year forecast for AM services in Consumer
4.5.2. Ten-year forecast for AM services in Design
4.5.3. Ten-year forecast for AM services in Jewelry
4.5.4. Ten-year forecast for AM services by sub-vertical

5. Companies and applications driving AM adoption in consumer product
5.1. Footwear companies and AM applications
5.1.1. Midsoles
5.1.2. Insoles and sandals
5.1.3. Uppers
5.1.4. Entire shoes
5.1.5. Tools
5.2. Eyewear companies and AM applications
5.2.1. Frames
5.2.2. Lenses
5.2.3. Tools and prototypes
5.3. Sportswear (and sporting accessories) companies and AM applications
5.3.1. Helmets and protective gear
5.3.2. Accessories and parts
5.4. Consumer electronics companies and AM applications
5.4.1. Audio products
5.4.2. Drones
5.4.3. Electronics prototyping and spare parts
5.5. Jewelry and luxury accessories companies and AM applications
5.5.1. Tools and prototypes
5.5.2. Direct precious metal 3D printing
5.6. Fashion companies and AM applications
5.7. Toys companies and AM applications
5.7.1. Action figures
5.7.2. Miniatures and RCs
5.7.3. Board games
5.8. Furniture and design products companies and AM applications
5.8.1. Furniture
5.8.2. Lighting
5.8.3. Bathroom
5.9. Analysis of AM adopters for consumer products
5.9.1. AM adopters in Consumer
5.9.2. AM adopters in Design
5.9.3. AM adopters in Jewelry
5.10. Ten-year forecast of AM adopters for consumer products
5.10.1. Ten-year forecast for AM adopters in Consumer
5.10.2. Ten-year forecast for AM adopters in Design
5.10.3. Ten-year forecast for AM adopters in Jewelry

Table of Figures

1. Introduction to 3D printing of consumer products

Figure 1. Internal Vs External use of 3D printing for consumer products manufacturing
Figure 2. Types of consumer products that can be 3D printed
Figure 3. TAM for consumer products 3D printing
Figure 4. Total revenues (Hardware, Materials, Services and Adopters) 2022–2023
Figure 5. Ten-year forecast of total revenues (Hardware, Materials, Services and Adopters) 2023-2033
Figure 6. CAGR of total revenues

2. AM hardware adoption in consumer products industry segments

Figure 7. Timeline of key events
Figure 8. Leading MEX hardware companies in consumer products AM and key applications
Figure 9. Leading VPP hardware companies in consumer products AM and key applications
Figure 10. Leading polymer PBF hardware companies in consumer products AM and key applications
Figure 11. Leading MJP hardware companies in consumer products AM and key applications
Figure 12. Leading Metal PBF hardware companies in consumer products AM and key applications
Figure 13. Leading MBJ hardware companies in consumer products AM and key applications
Figure 14. Leading bound metal printing (BMP) hardware companies in consumer products AM and key applications
Figure 15. Leading directed energy deposition (DED) hardware companies in consumer products AM and key applications
Figure 16. Leading Ceramic HW companies for consumer products
Figure 17. Polymer and metal AM hardware unit sales in the consumer industry by technology (2022–2023)
Figure 18. Polymer and metal AM hardware revenues in the consumer industry by technology (2022–2023)
Figure 19. Polymer and metal AM hardware unit sales in the design industry by technology (2022–2023)
Figure 20. Polymer and metal AM hardware revenues in the design industry by technology (2022–2023)
Figure 21. Polymer and metal AM hardware unit sales in the jewelry industry by technology (2022–2023)
Figure 22. Polymer and metal AM hardware revenues in the jewelry industry by technology (2022–2023)
Figure 23. Polymer and metal AM hardware unit sales by subvertical (2022–2023)
Figure 24. Polymer and metal AM hardware revenues by subvertical (2022–2023)
Figure 25. Polymer and metal AM hardware unit sales in the consumer industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 26. Polymer and metal AM hardware revenues in the consumer industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 27. Polymer and metal AM hardware revenue CAGR in the consumer industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 28. Polymer and metal AM hardware unit sales in the design industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 29. Polymer and metal AM hardware revenues in the design industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 30. Polymer and metal AM hardware revenue CAGR in the design industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 31. Polymer and metal AM hardware unit sales in the jewelry industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 32. Polymer and metal AM hardware revenues in the jewelry industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 33. Polymer and metal AM hardware revenue CAGR in the jewelry industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 34. Polymer and metal AM hardware unit sales by subvertical 2023-2033
Figure 35. Polymer and metal AM hardware revenues by subvertical 2023-2033
Figure 36. Polymer and metal AM hardware revenue CAGR by subvertical 2023-2033

3. Evolving material demand in consumer additive manufacturing

Figure 37. Leading TPU/TPE filament products
Figure 38. Common TPU/TPE pellet products available commercially for AM
Figure 39. Neat nylon 12 powder products for L-PBF
Figure 40. Neat nylon 12 powder products for thermal PBF
Figure 41. Neat nylon 11 powder products for L-PBF
Figure 42. Neat nylon 11 powder products for thermal PBF
Figure 43. Table of available polyamide filament products
Figure 44. Table of available polyamide pellet products
Figure 45. Table of available PET and PETG filament products
Figure 46. Table of available PET and PETG pellet products
Figure 47. Table of available polypropylene filament products
Figure 48. Table of available polypropylene pellet products
Figure 49. Polypropylene powder products for PBF
Figure 50. Table of available PLA filament products
Figure 51. Table of available PLA pellet products
Figure 52. Modeling resins for vat photopolymerization (SLA, DLP, LCD) in consumer products applications
Figure 53. Castable resins for vat photopolymerization (SLA, DLP, LCD) in consumer products applications
Figure 54. First party tough, rigid and durable resins for vat photopolymerization (SLA, DLP, LCD)
Figure 55. Third party tough, rigid and durable resins for vat photopolymerization (SLA, DLP, LCD)
Figure 56. First-party high-temperature resins for vat photopolymerization (SLA, DLP, LCD)
Figure 57. Third-party high-temperature and dielectric resins for vat photopolymerization (SLA, DLP, LCD)
Figure 58. Flexible resins available commercially for vat photopolymerization (SLA, DLP, LCD)
Figure 59. Common urethane-based resins available commercially for AM
Figure 60. Common silicone-based resins available commercially for AM
Figure 61. Modeling resins available commercially for material jetting
Figure 62. Tough, rigid and durable resins available commercially for material jetting
Figure 63. High temperature resistant and dielectric resins for material jetting
Figure 64. Flexible resins for material jetting
Figure 65. Silicone products available commercially for extrusion
Figure 66. Polyurethane products available commercially for extrusion 3D printing
Figure 67. Stainless Steel alloy material products used on consumer products AM
Figure 68. Titanium alloy powder products for AM
Figure 69. Precious metal powder products for AM
Figure 70. Aluminum alloy products for AM
Figure 71. Polymer and metal AM material volume of sales in the consumer industry by material form (2022–2023)
Figure 72. Polymer and metal AM material revenues in the consumer industry by material form (2022–2023)
Figure 73. Polymer and metal AM material volume of sales in the design industry by material form (2022–2023)
Figure 74. Polymer and metal AM material revenues in the design industry by material form (2022–2023)
Figure 75. Polymer and metal AM material volume of sales in the jewelry industry by material form (2022–2023)
Figure 76. Polymer and metal AM material revenues in the jewelry industry by material form (2022–2023)
Figure 77. Polymer and metal AM material volume of sales by subvertical (2022–2023)
Figure 78. Polymer and metal AM material revenues by subvertical (2022–2023)
Figure 79. Polymer and metal AM material volume of sales in the consumer industry by material form 2023-2033
Figure 80. Polymer and metal AM material revenues in the consumer industry by material form 2023-2033
Figure 81. Polymer and metal AM material revenue CAGR in the consumer industry by material form 2023-2033
Figure 82. Polymer and metal AM material volume of sales in the design industry by material form 2023-2033
Figure 83. Polymer and metal AM material revenues in the design industry by material form 2023-2033
Figure 84. Polymer and metal AM material revenue CAGR in the design industry by material form 2023-2033
Figure 85. Polymer and metal AM material volume of sales in the jewelry industry by material form 2023-2033
Figure 86. Polymer and metal AM material revenues in the jewelry industry by material form 2023-2033
Figure 87. Polymer and metal AM material revenue CAGR in the jewelry industry by material form 2023-2033
Figure 88. Polymer and metal AM material volume of sales by subvertical 2023-2033
Figure 89. Polymer and metal AM material revenues by subvertical 2023-2033
Figure 90. Polymer and metal AM material revenue CAGR by subvertical 2023-2033

4. Leveraging AM services for consumer products

Figure 91. Polymer and metal AM services number of parts in the consumer industry by technology (2022–2023)
Figure 92. Polymer and metal AM services revenues in the consumer industry by technology (2022–2023)
Figure 93. Polymer and metal AM services number of parts in the design industry by technology (2022–2023)
Figure 94. Polymer and metal AM services revenues in the design industry by technology (2022–2023)
Figure 95. Polymer and metal AM services number of parts in the jewelry industry by technology (2022–2023)
Figure 96. Polymer and metal AM services revenues in the jewelry industry by technology (2022–2023)
Figure 97. Polymer and metal AM services number of parts by subvertical (2022–2023)
Figure 98. Polymer and metal AM services revenues by subvertical (2022–2023)
Figure 99. Polymer and metal AM services number of parts in the consumer industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 100. Polymer and metal AM services revenues in the consumer industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 101. Polymer and metal AM services revenue CAGR in the consumer industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 102. Polymer and metal AM services number of parts in the design industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 103. Polymer and metal AM services revenues in the design industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 104. Polymer and metal AM services revenue CAGR in the design industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 105. Polymer and metal AM services number of parts in the jewelry industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 106. Polymer and metal AM services revenues in the jewelry industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 107. Polymer and metal AM services revenue CAGR in the jewelry industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 108. Polymer and metal AM services number of parts by subvertical 2023-2033
Figure 109. Polymer and metal AM services revenues by subvertical 2023-2033
Figure 110. Polymer and metal AM services revenue CAGR by subvertical 2023-2033

5. Companies and applications driving AM adoption in consumer product

Figure 111. Types of footwear 3D printing applications
Figure 112. Types of eyewear 3D printing applications
Figure 113. Types of sportswear 3D printing applications
Figure 114. Types of consumer electronics 3D printing applications
Figure 115. Polymer and metal AM adopters number of parts in the consumer industry by technology (2022–2023)
Figure 116. Polymer and metal AM adopters revenues in the consumer industry by technology (2022–2023)
Figure 117. Polymer and metal AM adopters number of parts in the design industry by technology (2022–2023)
Figure 118. Polymer and metal AM adopters revenues in the design industry by technology (2022–2023)
Figure 119. Polymer and metal AM adopters number of parts in the jewelry industry by technology (2022–2023)
Figure 120. Polymer and metal AM adopters revenues in the jewelry industry by technology (2022–2023)
Figure 121. Polymer and metal AM adopters number of parts in the consumer industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 122. Polymer and metal AM adopters revenues in the consumer industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 123. Polymer and metal AM adopters revenue CAGR in the consumer industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 124. Polymer and metal AM adopters number of parts in the design industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 125. Polymer and metal AM adopters revenues in the design industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 126. Polymer and metal AM adopters revenue CAGR in the design industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 127. Polymer and metal AM adopters number of parts in the jewelry industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 128. Polymer and metal AM adopters revenues in the jewelry industry by technology 2023-2033
Figure 129. Polymer and metal AM adopters revenue CAGR in the jewelry industry by technology 2023-2033

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